All You Can Ever Know
All You Can Ever Know
by

  • All You Can Ever Know is story for our moment, ripe with themes including identity, motherhood, racism, trauma, family politics, and belonging. Chung traces her birth to Korean immigrant parents in Seattle, closed adoption by white parents, and an upbringing in a small town in Oregon, the reunion with her birth family that coincided with the… (more)
  • All You Can Ever Know is story for our moment, ripe with themes including identity, motherhood, racism, trauma, family politics, and belonging. Chung traces her birth to Korean immigrant parents in Seattle, closed adoption by white parents, and an upbringing in a small town in Oregon, the reunion with her birth family that coincided with the birth of her first child, and what happened after the reunion as she intentionally incorporated what she learned into her identity and the parenting of her own children
  • Nicole Chung is the former managing editor of the cultural website The Toast, which earned cult status on the internet and a passionate, active community of readers. We will be able to tap into this network for preorders, marketing, buzz-building on social media, and events coast to coast
  • Chung's memoir will of course resonate with adoptees, especially those from transracial and closed adoptions, but also with anyone who feels different or apart from their families. As a mother of biracial children, the only progressive in her extended family, and a member of a multicultural family (first by adoption and then by marriage), Chung explores complex (and often unspoken) family dynamics that will feel familiar across the spectrum of readers' experiences
  • November is National Adoption Month, and November 23 is National Adoption Awareness Day. As of 2013, 40 percent of adoptions were children who were adopted into families from a different cultural background. Yet few adoptee voices are genuinely centered in traditional adoption narratives, let alone in nonprofit or government adoption resources, parenting guides, etc. All You Can Ever Know offers a long-missing perspective, and will serve as a timely and important conversation-starter as well as a much-needed resource
  • Chung writes, "This memoir has always felt like one I had to write—for many reasons, one being to make space for myself and for stories like mine. The phrase I sometimes employ is that this book was tapping me on the shoulder for years (maybe for my entire life, as long as I’ve thought and talked about adoption). . . . I wanted to write this book for my family, for my parents and my sister and especially my children, so they would always know the things I didn’t growing up. I wanted to write it for other adoptees and birth parents and their families, for anyone considering adoption, for anyone who’s ever wanted to better understand adoption, or only been exposed to the Hallmark-movie versions of it. And I also wanted to write it for anyone who’s ever wondered about the deep, dark family secrets no one wants to talk about, who has perhaps lost their roots or their culture, or grown up between two—or many—cultures, or wondered what sort of unknown or mixed legacy they will pass on to their own kids."
  • Chung’s essay, “On American Identity, the Election, and Family Members Who Support Trump” was widely shared and included in the Nasty Women anthology: https://longreads.com/2017/09/28/on-american-identity-the-election-and-family-members-who-support-trump/
  • Chung’s recent interview with her childhood hero Kristi Yamaguchi for Shondaland was also widely shared: http://www.shondaland.com/inspire/a14436692/kristi-yamaguchi-interview/
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    Publisher: Catapult (October 01, 2018)

    Page count: 240 pages

    Protection: DRM

    Language: English

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